Everyday Mystery and Wonder
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willanimateforwine:

lack of posting explained: swallowed by computerless wilderness. My bed’s still rocking when I go to sleep.

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(Source: dolcebliss)

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How to color eggs with onion shells.

wewantwow:

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This must be the most beautiful DIY tutorial I have ever seen. And it so happens to be in style of this weekend. Found on Ulicam, a very nice blog by Ulrika Kestere, photographer and illustrator. For the whole tutorial and lot’s of inspiration, click here.

posted 1 hour ago with 162,442 notes
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catbountry:

ex-wife:

did-you-kno:

Source 

"When I got my first cat, it changed me. There is something about holding a cat that makes your anger melt away. And if someone does something that upsets me—I have to remember my cat. I can’t keep my cat if I get into trouble.”

"I asked if Major Cabanaw had concerns for the safety of the cats. “Of course, we always want to ensure the safety of the cats, and the staff is great about keeping an eye out for them. But mostly, it’s the offenders keeping them safe. I have never once seen an offender kill his own cat. We screen them to be sure they have no history of animal abuse. But I’ll tell you this, there was a guy killed in here because he had spit soda pop onto someone else’s cat.”"

Wow.

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(Source: teenagenicks)

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#epilepsy warning

(Source: millisecondanalysis)

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(Source: maorisakai)

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Why Mixed with White isn't White

thisisnotjapan:

-By Sharon H. Chang

When I wrote my first post for Hyphen, Talking Mixed-Race Identity with Young Children, I was deliberately blunt about race. I wrote about how I don’t tell my multiracial son, who presents as a racial minority, that he’s white — but I do tell him he’s Asian. While the essay resonated with many people, others made comments like this: 

“Your child is as white as he is Asian… Why embrace one label and not the other?”

“Why is he Asian but not white? He has white ancestors as much as Asian ones. So if it’s OK to call him Asian, it’s OK to call him white. Or, if it’s not OK to call him white (because he’s not completely white) then it’s not OK to call him Asian, because he’s not completely Asian either.”

“Your child is neither white nor Asian. I once heard this description: When you have a glass of milk and add chocolate to it, you no longer have just a glass of milk and you no longer just have chocolate because you have created something completely different. A bi-racial or multi-racial child is not either/or.”

In the 1990s, psychologist and mixed-race scholar Maria P.P. Root wrote the famous Bill of Rights for People of Mixed Heritage, stirred by her examination of mixed-race identity, interviews with hundreds of multiracial folk across the U.S., and the struggles multiracial people face in forming and claiming a positive sense of self. “I have the right not to justify my existence to the world,” it reads. “To identify myself differently than strangers expect me to identify. To create a vocabulary about being multiracial or multiethnic.”

Almost two decades later, these proclamations still ring so true. Some people are completely unwilling to honor my family’s choice to identify as mixed-race and Asian because it doesn’t align with their own ideas about how we should identify. The right of a mixed-race person to self-construct and self-define, even today, endures continual policing from people with their own agendas.

If it’s not OK to call him white…then it’s not OK to call him Asian”; “Your child is neither white nor Asian.” These critiques are so often centered on whiteness: a sense of disbelief that I would “deny” it to my son, and the conviction that, if I won’t teach him he is white too — or at least partly white — then he is nothing at all. Even the problematic chocolate milk analogy — which the commenter clearly thought was progressive — begins with a glass of white milk with “color” added. White is seen as normative, and there is a total failure to recognize that racial categories are political

Of course I talk to my son about our white family members who are a part of his life and his identity. But those stories are about growing up in Virginia, or window candles at Christmastime in New England, or his Slovakian great-great-grandmother who came through Ellis Island alone when she was sixteen. Those stories are about our history, not about being “white.” “White” is not an ethnic celebration, a food festival, or a heritage parade. It’s about having unearned power and privilege based on the way you look.

In Dr. Peggy McIntosh’s famous essay on white privilege, she listed a series of unearned privileges white people enjoy. Among them: “I can if I wish arrange to be in the company of people of my race most of the time”; “I can turn on the television or open to the front page of the paper and see people of my race widely represented”; “I can speak in public to a powerful male group without putting my race on trial”; and “I can be pretty sure that if I ask to talk to the ‘person in charge,’ I will be facing a person of my race.” Are any of these true of my multiracial Asian son? My son, who barely has any children’s books that reflect his racial image, who is constantly scanned and assessed aloud based on “how Asian” he looks, my son who has had many more white teachers than teachers of color? 

Telling my child he’s white also won’t help him understand why children who were less than one-quarter Japanese were interned during World War II; why a stranger would look at him and say there are no “pure races” anymore; why a leading theatre company in our city unabashedly staged a yellowface production of an operetta; why kids on the playground pull back their eyes in a slant and spit out one of those ridiculous anti-Asian chants that just won’t go away. When I tell my son that he is Asian, mixed-race, multiracial, and a person of color, I’m not denying him parts of his ancestral-ethnic heritage. I’m teaching him about the race politics that intrude upon our lives whether we want them to or not. I’m preparing him to exist in a world that obstinately persists in being racially divided. And I’m trying to let him know something about the ways he has and will continue to be judged throughout his life, not because he’s white — but because he’s mixed with color.

posted 8 hours ago with 1,402 notes
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captainsassgard:

sixpenceee:

  1. THE UP SERIES: It follows the lives of 14 children through their lives interviewing them every seven years. It’s amazing to see how they change and where they go. It shows that personality traits do not tend to be very static. Being introverted at 18 doesn’t determine how you’ll be at 32. A girl on there around 20 was totally against having a family and was very cynical about relationships and marriage. Next interview, she was happily wed with children. I link you to 7 UP, which is the first documentary in the series. 
  2. QUEEN OF VERSAILLES:If you have any interest in the SUPER RICH of America and how absolutely delusional they can be, then this documentary will blow your mind. It’s a great window into the lives of people who literally have everything a person could need. Even when they loose everything, they’re entirely incapable of believing that they’re a normal citizen.
  3. THE ACT OF KILLINGOne review describes it as: “This is the most gut-wrenching film I’ve ever seen. It actually makes you understand the nature and true face of evil, and it’s terrifying because it’s so, so normal. After watching it you know that in some other life, you could be him.”
  4. BABIESIt shows the different ways, different cultures raise their children. It shows how different but similar we all are at the end. They documentary follows 4 different babies, from Mongalia, to Tokyo, to Namibia and then the U.S
  5. INSIDE NORTH KOREA: An eye-opening film that shows you the truth about a hidden country 
  6. TOUCHING THE VOIDA documentary about two mountain climbers who have an accident on their way back. As one review described it: “Better than any fictional suspense film. Just unreal. You know throughout that the two climbers lived because you’re sitting there watching them narrate, but at times you just can’t believe it.”
  7. THE COVE: A 2009 documentary film that analyzes and questions dolphin hunting practices in Japan. One review described it as “an impeccably crafted, suspenseful expose of the covert slaughter of dolphins in Japan.”
  8. THIS IS WHAT WINNING LOOKS LIKEThe documentary follows U.S. Marines as they train Afghan security forces, showing their ineptitude, drug abuse, sexual misconduct, and corruption as well as the reduced role of US Marines due to the troop withdrawal.
  9. BBC PLANET EARTH (All 11 Episodes): An HD exploration of our world. You’ll just love everything about this, trust me. 
  10. JESUS CAMP: About a Christian summer camp, where children spend their summers being taught that they have “prophetic gifts” and can “take back America for Christ”. This documentary led to the shut down of this summer camp. 

You may also like 10 Disturbing Documentaries

Feel free to add to this list!

NORTH KOREA UNDERCOVER: Another NK documentary because while it’s incredibly disturbing, I also found this one to be really interesting. Seems more serious than the other one.

posted 10 hours ago with 40,406 notes
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